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Recycled Water

Long Beach Recycled Water System Expansion

The Long Beach Water Department remains committed to developing alternative sources of water to supplement precious imported potable water to meet the annual water demands our customers, particularly those using potable water primarily for industrial and irrigation operations.

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Phase 1

This phase of the expansion project also allows THUMS, a collection of oil companies operating offshore drilling platforms in Long Beach Harbor, to use 1,100 acre-feet of recycled water to re-pressurize oil-bearing strata, saving an equal amount of imported potable water in the process.

Another critical part of Phase 1 is the Leo Vander Lans Treatment Facility that allows the utilization of 3,000 acre-feet of highly treated recycled water, in part, for groundwater recharge to protect against seawater intrusion.

Phase 2

This phase of the project will see, among other events, the connection of two large power generation facilities, in the southeast part of the City, operated by the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power and AES Southland Company.  These connections will enable these facilities to use recycled water for industrial operations, saving nearly 570 acre-feet of potable water annually.

Phases 3 and 4

These phases will see the city's recycled water system expanded to the west connecting to large industrial users in the Port of Long Beach.

Water and Sewer Services

Delivering Quality Service

The Long Beach Water Department provides water and sewer services to nearly half a million people through more than 90,000 service connections.  The department’s more than 200 employees work hard every day to ensure that these services are delivered with the highest levels of quality, reliability and customer service.

Helpful Water Meter Information

Getting familiar with where your water meter is located and how it works is easy to do and can be very helpful to you in monitoring your property’s water use and any potential leaks.

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If you have additional questions about how to locate or read your water meter, please call (562) 570-2390.

Helpful Water Meter Information

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Getting familiar with where your water meter is located and how it works is easy to do and can be very helpful to you in monitoring your property’s water use and any potential leaks.

Where is your water meter located?

Fire Hydrants Stolen

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Seven hydrants missing since July 24th; Water Department Sends Warning to Thieves

Long Beach Finishes Fiscal Year with Record Low Number of Main Breaks

26 main breaks occurred in Long Beach during the past 12 months, the lowest annual total ever for the City; coincides with record high levels of water conservation